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Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
to see with my dear friend senator warner, a decorated navy and marine veteran from world war ii and korean war, a longtime member of this committee. it was good to see him here. he exemplifies and forgive my va centers and for a minute, he exemplifies something that is very important commonwealth. yorktown, appomattox, the pentagon where 9/11 occurred -- there is a ceremony tonight i will be commissioned in -- there is a commission in april. we care very deeply about these events. one in nine virginians birth to death is a veteran. when you add in the guard and reserve and contractors, now you are probably talking about one in three of us. we care very deeply about all that is within dod. let me be plain, the threat that virginians and others are talking about now more than ever is the inability of congress to find a way forward on a reasonable budget compromise. that is what is in the newspapers and the headlines. at the direction of the deputy director, dod is planning for future cuts. i am very worried at the macro level about dod's ability to pursue and execute appropriate n
.s. -- enlisted in the u.s. navy to fight in world war ii. that was the start of his great career in public service, and john, i am proud to be here by your side. mr. chairman, i spent a lot of time sitting in your seat, and congratulations on not having to do that today -- >> i don't know how long it will last, but thanks for pointing it out. >> you and senator mccain have effectively guided this committee in its important role as an compelling voice for defense. you have managed to pass authorization bills even during contentious times. thank you both for your dedicated service to our nation. i am confident that you and senator inhofe will continue this tradition, and that senator mccain will still be a very, very valuable member and a voice on this committee. i believe our nation is fortunate to have a nominee for secretary of defense with the character and the experience and courage and leadership that chuck hagel would bring to this position. first, chuck is acutely aware that even in an age of rapid technological advances, our military capability and effectiveness depend on the qualit
considerable experience in this business. he had been secretary of the navy under ronald reagan and assistant secretary of defense under ronald reagan and one of the most decorated veterans of vietnam. united states senator. celebrated author. lawyer. and i thought he made a pretty strong, persuasive case. so did many of us. >> let's turn to cyber security. i was pleased that you mentioned cyber security in your initial remarks. the pentagon has moved expand its cyber security efforts. i have to talk about colorado. the air force academy is well positioned to train those new experts. would you talk a little more on your take on cyber security and what sort of resources we need. >> i've been to those facilities in colorado a few times and don't know as much about them as you do, but i am familiar with them. they are essential to our national security. cyber, i believe represents as big a threat to the security of this country as any one specific threat. for all the reasons this committee understands. it's an insidious, quiet, kind of a threat that we have never quite seen before. it can paraly
between china and japan. it was revealed that the chinese vessel had lot weapons on the japanese navy. i want to hear how much you think an issue this was. >> i was just in that part of the world in the last few months. i had a chance to go to japan and visit with my counterparts in japan and discuss their concerns and then i went on to china to talk with them about their concerns as well. i believe that, especially the secaucus islands and the dispute over that, that territorial dispute, is one that concerns as -- us a great deal. it is the kind of situation where their territorial claims that could ultimately get out of hand and one country or the other could react in a way that could create an even greater crisis. we urge, obviously, both the chinese and the japanese to exercise good judgment. in the pacific, this is a big region. part of our reason to rebalance to the pacific is because we think that, in many ways, our future economic security, our trade relationships, our security relationships will be in that part of the world. and we have great allies in japan and south korea and
to a place -- >> that is not a bad idea. sometimes it is on a navy vessel or sometimes it is back here in the united states. we bring them into a process and we can elicit information from them and put them behind bars. >> is the article iii process an ideal way? isn't there limitations in that process? >> i'm proud of our system of laws here and the article iii process and our track record is strong over the past couple dozen years. so many terrorists have been, in fact, been -- >> i understand. but the first priority is to develop information. but in article iii is not the most conducive to that. >> i disagree with that. >> what about turning over information that will incriminate them? >> it is tailored to the sixes. sometimes an individual will be mandaized. it means that the information they give you cannot be used in court. but in fact, the f.b.i. does a great job in eliciting information so they can get information as part of that negotiation with them. they let them know they can languish forever or we can have a dialogue about it. >> just last point. this case that i talked ab
as in the history of the country, the smallest navy since 1915, the smallest farms since 1940. it is about the cia. it is their intelligence gathering capabilities. it is also about public education. it is about non-defense matters. so i am hopeful that we can finally start voting in the senate rather than just complaining about what the house does. to the president, we bear responsibility as republicans for allowing this to happen. lead us to a better solution. if you do not, mr. president, he will go down in history in my view is one of the most irresponsible commanders in chief in the history of the country for what you have done, mr. president, that you allow the finest military in history of the world to deteriorate at a time that we needed it the most. let's not let that happen. >> let me just add or emphasize three quick points. one is, reducing civilians by attrition is a good idea, even at dod. i would remind you that yesterday, the recently departed secretary for policy argued in the washington post that we needed to reduce civilians at dod as a way of improving efficiency within the pen
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)

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